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Tomorrow.io is Going to Space!

Welcome to
Operation
Tomorrow Space

To improve global forecasting technology and capabilities, we have designed proprietary radar-equipped satellites and will begin launching dozens into space over the coming years.

Nicknamed "Operation Tomorrow Space", our small-satellite constellation will be a first in the history of the weather industry, and bring critical weather radar coverage to the entire globe.

Learn about Operation Tomorrow Space below and stay tuned to this page for consistent updates from now until launch!

Tomorrow.io Satellite

75%

Of the global population still lives outside of weather radar coverage.

50X

Improvement in average revisit rate of active radars from space, from 3 days to 1 hour.

95%

Reduction in both size and cost from existing active scanning radars.

Shimon Elkabetz

Shimon Elkabetz,

CEO and Co-founder, Tomorrow.io

Blue Quote

We are building the first-of-its-kind proprietary satellites equipped with radar, and launching them into space to improve weather monitoring and forecasting capabilities.

It's All About
Radar in Space

Known for pioneering a number of weather technology advancements in recent years, Tomorrow.io’s radar-equipped small-satellite constellation represents a first in the history of the weather industry.

Radar is used to power weather forecasts. Radar is a critical sensor driving weather forecasts - they provide detailed information about precipitation and cloud structure that no other sensor can see.

More than 70 years after radar was invented, more than 5 billion people still live outside of radar coverage, making even the most basic forecasts a dream for the vast majority of humanity. Even in the United States, there are still many regions with limited or no radar coverage.

Tomorrow.io satellite beaming to Earth
Rei Goffer

Rei Goffer,

CSO and Co-founder, Tomorrow.io

Blue Quote

We are positioned for an exciting year in 2021 with Operation Tomorrow Space at the lead of our continued disruption and pioneering across the weather technology industry and beyond.

Listen to a conversation with Rei Goffer to learn more about Operation Tomorrow Space

Frequently asked questions

Radar is a class of active sensors that emit pulses of electromagnetic energy at microwave frequencies through the atmosphere to detect objects such as rain and cloud droplets. Active sensors can be configured to detect certain characteristics of precipitation such as the size, shape, orientation, or composition of the droplet. This is critical to provide highly accurate data into everyday weather products, from consumer apps to navigation advisory for commercial airlines.

Radar is used to power real-time situational awareness, short-term nowcasts, medium-term forecasts, and climate studies. Radar is often the critical sensor that drives weather forecasts, providing detailed information about precipitation and cloud structure that no other sensor can see.

Deploying radar on the ground to close this gap would be practically impossible - we can’t cover the oceans, and it’ll be very difficult to get to remote regions and vast land areas such as those in Africa, Latin America, and SE Asia. It’s been about 70 years since the first weather radar was invented, and we still haven’t been able to cover but a fraction of the globe. See this map from the World Meteorological Organization for more details.

Roughly 5 billion - most of the population of South and Central America, Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. Even in the United States, there are still many regions with limited or no radar coverage.

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